Tag Archives: dog walks

The Leaning Tower of Pesto (wild garlic again)

Zeb on the Wild Garlic Trail

The south-west and west of England are a good place to find wild garlic (allium ursinum) though I have seen it growing along the banks of the River Cocker in Cockermouth, tucked in the damp trough of the old Mill Race.

Mill Race At Cockermouth

If it likes a spot it will surely but slowly colonize the ground. It likes damp and it likes light dappled shade, and it comes into flower more or less as the trees start to leaf up, though you can pick the leaves much earlier in the year when it first emerges.  Once the canopy has filled out and the trees are in full leaf overhead,  the leaves shrivel and the wild garlic plants set seed and vanish for another year. You can also buy bulbs from suppliers on the internet if you want to try growing it in your garden.

Garlic Slopes

I first came across it many years ago as a student when I walked from Wooton-under-Edge to Bath on part of the Cotswold Way with two friends, much fitter and light of foot than me. It was a hot weekend and I was glad to get out of the bright sunshine in the cow pastures and bridleways and walk through a cool green wood for a time.  The pungent and distinctive smell of garlic was everywhere, starry white flowers drifting up the slopes, with bluebells and cow parsley layered in.  I remember wrinkling my nose and saying, ‘But that’s garlic!’  I think I thought then that garlic only grew in warmer Mediterranean countries.

Garlic everywhere

The memory stayed with me for many years and when I moved to Bristol eight years ago and found it growing in almost every damp woodland here I researched it, realised it was edible and now pick some every year to use in my cooking. It has become very trendy and fashionable and is sold at farmers’ markets in London and around the country.

 If you were in one of these woods in January you wouldn’t really believe that come May they can be carpeted with garlic, I reckon it is one of the safer plants for the beginner to pick and eat as the smell of the leaves is so distinctive, having said that bluebells and anenomes are poisonous so do make sure that you can distinguish between them. I have read also that some people confuse lily of the valley with wild garlic. I have never seen them growing together here, but again it is worth bearing in mind. I have some older posts on this blog with close up photos but if you search internet images you should find many photos and descriptions to help you. It is worth noting that the plants do vary in size. The ones we picked yesterday were very big and tall, but the ones I see more locally are shorter and smaller.

one last pic of the wild garlicThe plants die back in the summer and all that are left are the bulbs hidden underground till next year, so it really is very seasonal.

I haven’t picked much this year, just one lot that I used in the semolina bun bread last month and at the weekend on our walk I thought I would grab a dog bag’s worth and make some pesto to put in the freezer as the ‘season’ is almost over.

Wild Garlic Pesto

I can tell you what I did and what I put in it, but I haven’t got really good quantiities for you as I made it by eye and taste.  Pesto is one of those Humpty Dumpty words these days as people seem to put what they like in it, some people leave the cheese out altogether, some people add lemon,  but it is a convenient word so I use it here.

Leaning Tower of Pesto

  • A well packed doggy bag of garlic leaves, flowers and buds, probably 500g or so
  • About 200 g of finely ground Pecorino hard cheese ( a sheep’s milk cheese with a strong taste which I prefer to Parmesan)
  • About 150 g of coarsely ground hazelnuts, I like it a bit chunky! It seems a waste to put expensive pine nuts in there as the garlic taste is so strong I don’t think you would be able to taste the pine nuts to be honest.
  • salt to taste
  • Good olive oil or cold pressed rapeseed oil to blend

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We put the garlic in the food processor and added olive oil until the leaves were chopped up, then added the other ingredients and held back on the oil to make a thick creamy paste. I don’t like pesto when it it very oily.

I then spooned it into little 2.5 cm tubs and put them in the freezer. I have read that some people freeze them in ice cube trays and then pop them out and store them that way, but it is one more process and I am a lazy person!

I had held back a handful of leaves and Brian made this wonderful dish which we had for supper with the Black Badger peas that I had cooked a few weeks back and frozen.

The Black Badgers have quite coarse skins but these seem to have softened up in the process of being frozen and defrosted and I think they are fantastic.

Brian came up with this which reminded me of really good hippy food from the 1970s and 80s -think Cranks, and Food For Thought and the Hare Krishna restaurant on Soho Square. We ate them with a piece of Cumberland sausage and some pita bread and some steamed purple sprouting broccoli.

Black Badgers with Wild Garlic and Pecorino and Parsley

Brian’s Hippy Cheesy Garliccy Black Badger Peas

  • 250g of well cooked  British Black Badger Peas (bought from Hodmedods)
  • One Medium Onion finely sliced
  • A handful of wild garlic leaves and flowers chopped lightly
  • ½ teaspoon of cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon mixed spice
  • water
  • 100 – 150 g of left over grated Pecorino cheese
  • a handful of roughly chopped flat leaf parsley to finish
  1. On a low heat in a good heavy pan
  2. Sweat the onion in 2 tbps of butter and  a slosh of olive oil till translucent and soft
  3. Add the chopped garlic leaves and stir for a minute or two
  4. Add the Black Badgers to the pan
  5. Sprinkle the spices in and stir well
  6. Add 2 – 3 tablespoons of water to this to stop the BB’s catching on the bottom of the pan
  7. Cover with lid and check from time to time that there is liquid in the pan, top up if necessary, but you only want enough to stop them sticking, not swimming!
  8. Grill your sausage and steam your purple sprouting broccoli for extra vegetabley goodness
  9. Bake your flat breads – I made pita once more, such fun making pita bread so any excuse!
  10. Before you serve, take the pan off the heat add the grated Pecorino and stir in, put the lid back on and leave to melt in and through the dish.

 If you can’t get Black Badgers, you could make something similar with locally grown peas or beans.  They are full of good fibre and protein and often overlooked in favour of perky fresh vegetable;  we lived on dried pulses in years past in this country, survived on them through the winter and the hungry gap when the new crops hadn’t come through yet.

What were the traditional winter foods where you live – before the days of freezers and 24 hour everything available all the time shops?

Walk at Westonbirt Arboretum

Westonbirt Arboretum in Gloucestershire has a magnetic pull on anyone wanting a Sunday walk on a cold bright November afternoon.

This is their busiest time of year and the acers are so busy being photographed that they barely have time to let another brilliant yellow leaf flutter delicately to the ground.

Zeb and his sister are in heaven here, no mountain bikes, no cars, the odd deep and muddy hole, grass and turf, leaves to tumble and other dogs to meet. Dogs are welcome in the Silk Wood and we dog walkers are very grateful indeed for their hospitality. Those of you who don’t like dogs have the old Arboretum to walk in untroubled by them too. Something for everyone here.

It’s a wonderful and magical place, full of peace, light, dappled shade, extraordinary trees, a friendly plant centre, a franchished restaurant/tea room which is OK, children’s play spaces, lots of events if you like them, workshops, all sorts goes on there.

Go for the jewel colours of the Autumn display, sneak off away from the main paths and wander across the badger sets, and look for butterflies and fungi, pose with trees, they’ve seen it all I imagine, and just have a lovely time.

I guess I should explain this one; it’s one of the nine visible entrances  to an enormous badger set (or sett) , not far from one of the main paths through the Arboretum, we reckoned the set covered an area at least twenty metres across, maybe more. Fortunately most poodles are not interested in going underground to explore.

All photos copyright Brian J Kent. All rights reserved. Taken with a Cannon Powershot G10.

Snowdrops at Painswick – dogs allowed!

Zeb is fond of gardens which allow well behaved dogs in on leads like Painswick Rococo Garden in Gloucestershire. Home of a zillion snowdrops for three precious weeks in February!

Red House at Painswick, GloucestershireGarden History has become very popular in England since the 1970s and has gone hand in hand with the restoration of  many lost and overgrown gardens from the grand gardens at Hampton Court to this small 18th century hillside gem. The West of England is full of wonderful places to visit, (well England as a whole is stuffed with gardens but I thought I should plug my region here,)  and if you like a few follies thrown in with your herbaceous borders,  then this is the place to come.

This week the sun shone and we headed off to see the snowdrops which we missed last year. Painswick Rococo Garden is reputed to have one of the greatest collections of naturalistic plantings of this beautiful early flower in the country. As we drove home we saw more spreading over banks by the road. En masse they all look very similar, but there are different species and they are avidly collected by snowdrop fanciers.

It’s a lovely place for a wander in the summer too, with its espaliered apples, and traditional vegetable beds, friendly gardeners, and shady promenades, a perfect setting for a Jane Austen afternoon outing.

There is always a great cup of tea and a wodge of homemade cake at the end of your ramble.

We had a pot of Earl Grey and a shared slice of fresh coffee cake once we had clambered up the hillside past the Eagle House, having visited the Pigeonnier, looked into the clarity of the Plunge Pool, admired the vista from in front of the Exedra  and generally mooched about in this 18th Century Pleasure Garden.

All photos by Brian!